@elephantsofsumatra

Lampung

Camouflage Camera Traps

Our attempts to camouflage camera traps were met with mixed results. Poachers and loggers have an appetite for destruction if they spot a camera.

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Road Block

When you are on the way to a remote location to set camera traps and your patrol team come across a river full of water hyacinth plants for 2 kilometers. It took us 24 hours to meander our way through this mess to finally be on our way to our destination. Extending our trip by another 2 days we managed to get all cameras in place.

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Wild Elephants of Way Kambas

A gorgeous herd of wild elephants make their way across the Way Kambas National park in the early morning hours captured on the Berdiri (http://www.berdiri.org) camera traps.

[KGVID]http://elephantsofsumatra.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Gajah-Liar.m4v[/KGVID]
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Don’t mess with Me!

This little guy still isn’t used to humans so much being a new born in the elephant conservation center of the way Kambas national park. So the closer I got to photograph him the more defensive he became with his mum keeping a keen eye on things.

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Bath like a King

I’ve seen and photographed the patrol elephants across all the provinces of Sumatra and this is one of my favourte bath time photos. All the elephants are bathed before they are taken on patrol to help protect the jungles and the remaining willdife from us humans. You can buy this print, link in the description.

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Wild Elephants of Way Kambas

[KGVID]http://elephantsofsumatra.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/wild-elephants-WK-3.mp4[/KGVID]

Nothing fills your heart with any more love than the sight of a beautiful family of wild elephants making their way through their natural habitat. Check out the little cutie in the middle. A beautiful thing to see on our camera traps. A lot of hard work goes into capturing such a simple image/video. Despite our best efforts most of our camera traps have been stolen by poachers in the area. But the camera traps we manage to maintain have captured some of the amazing wildlife still remaining inside the protected area of the Way Kambas National Park.

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Two new babies of Way Kambas

TWO NEW ELEPHANT BABIES BORN!!! Two gorgeous new babies were born this week in the Way Kambas National Park.

EAST LAMPUNG, NETRALNEWS.COM – A male Sumatran elephant (Elephas Maximus Sumatrensis) has been born at the Elephant Response Unit (ERU) in Tegalyoso, Way Kambas National Park, in East Lampung district on Monday (3/27).

A couple days earlier, a female Sumatran elephant was also born at Tegalyoso ERU. The female elephant baby was born by female elephant named Riska, with a body weight of 85 kilograms. Full article here > http://www.en.netralnews.com/news/currentnews/read/3275/way.sambas.national.park.welcomes.baby.male.sumatran.elephant

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Window of the Soul

The eyes can convey a million expressions. I have my own feelings about what the eye is telling me here. I want to know what you are seeing. What is the elephant feeling?

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Camera Traps and Surveys

Bang Distnan putting the final touches on a camera trap deep in the jungles of Sumatra. Documenting these amazing elephants across Sumatra means spending up to 10 days at a time hiking the jungles of Sumatra in search of locations to capture the elephants in the wild with camera traps. I have a camera trap program running across the Way Kambas National Park as well as the TWA Seblat Conservation area in Bengkulu. We spend days tracking and looking for the right locations and place camera traps. The issues we often face are poachers and illegal loggers who happen to stumble across the camera traps and steal them from fear of being caught so we take every precaution to secure the camera traps and camouflage them with paint as best we can.  So far we have mixed results from the camera trap work, but the rewards of finding and documenting the critically endangered Sumatran elephant in the wild is especially nice. Link in the description…

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Let’s TALK! #1

A lot of my photos include elements that for very obvious reasons people dislike. That’s just the nature of the situation and it’s natural for me to want to ducument the reality of the situation for the elephants be it good or bad. One of those issues is the use of bull hooks by the elephant carers in Sumatra. Some people argue (trust me they do) in the right hands and used correctly it is no problem while others argue that they should never ever be used and are a cruel method for directing an elephant. Well as my documentary work here keeps shifting gears and I find myself in more and more situations to actually help with my own projects I am quite interested to hear comments on this and the preferred alternatives. Please comment below…

 

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